Viradouro: Champion samba school of Rio’s 2020 Carnival

27 Feb

Viradouro, that paraded second on Sunday and which were the runner up in 2019, won its second carnival title in 2020, beating Grande Rio by the smallest of margins having tied after all the marks were added up. Mocidade was third; Beija-Flor, fourth; Salgueiro, fifth and Mangueira, champions in 2019, sixth.

União da Ilha and Estácio de Sá were relegated with Imperatriz promoted to the Grupo Especial. In 2021 twelve schools will parade in the Grupo Especial.

The results of Rio’s Carnival Parade in 2020 were:

  • Viradouro (269.6 out of 270)
  • Grande Rio (269.6)
  • Mocidade (269.4)
  • Beija-Flor (269.4)
  • Salgueiro (269.0)
  • Mangueira (268.9)
  • Portela (268.8)
  • Vila Isabel (268.6)
  • Unidos da Tijuca (267.6)
  • Sao Clemente (267.0)
  • Paraíso do Tuiuti (266.2)
  • Estácio de Sá (264.7)
  • União da Ilha (264.2)

Riotur photos of Viradouro’s parade, “Viradouro de alma lavada”, about As Ganhadeiras de Itapuã.

Oscar Week Activities 2020

27 Jan

In the week leading up to the 92nd Oscars, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences will present a series of public programs celebrating this year’s nominees in the Animated Feature Film, Documentary Feature, Documentary Short Subject, International Feature Film, Makeup and Hairstyling, and Animated and Live Action Short Film categories. All events will be held at the Academy’s Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills.

The schedule is as follows:

OSCAR WEEK: DOCUMENTARIES
Tuesday, February 4, 7:30 p.m.
Samuel Goldwyn Theater

Hosted by Academy Documentary Branch Governors Kate Amend, Rory Kennedy andRoger Ross Williams

The Academy showcases the nominated films and filmmakers in the Documentary Short Subject and Documentary Feature categories. The evening will include a presentation of clips from this year’s nominated films. Nominees from all ten documentaries will participate (schedules permitting).

OSCAR WEEK: SHORTS
Wednesday, February 5, 7:00 p.m.
Samuel Goldwyn Theater

Hosted by director Vicky Jenson

The Academy celebrates the nominated films and filmmakers in the Animated Short Film and Live Action Short Film categories. The evening will include a screening of all ten nominated shorts in their entirety, as well as discussions with all the nominated filmmakers (schedules permitting).

OSCAR WEEK: INTERNATIONAL FEATURE FILM
Thursday, February 6, 7:30 p.m.
Samuel Goldwyn Theater

Hosted by International Feature Film Award Executive Committee co-chairs Larry Karaszewski and Diane Weyermann

The Academy will spotlight this year’s nominees for Best International Feature Film, formerly known as Foreign Language Film. The night will feature clips from each nominated film, as well as a panel discussion with the directors (schedules permitting).

OSCAR WEEK: ANIMATED FEATURES
Saturday, February 8, 10:00 a.m.
Samuel Goldwyn Theater

Hosted by last year’s Animated Feature Film Oscar winners, Phil Lord and Christopher Miller

The Academy presents this year’s event celebrating the films and filmmakers nominated for Best Animated Feature Film. The program will feature clips from each film, with an onstage discussion with each group of nominated filmmakers (schedules permitting).

OSCAR WEEK: MAKEUP AND HAIRSTYLING SYMPOSIUM
Saturday, February 8, 3:00 p.m.
Samuel Goldwyn Theater

Hosted by Academy Makeup Artists and Hairstylists Branch Governors Kathryn L. Blondell, Lois Burwell and Howard Berger

The Academy will celebrate the artists nominated for the Makeup and Hairstyling award in our 14th annual event spotlighting this category. The event will include a screening of the “bake-off” reels that Academy branch members viewed before voting on the nominated films. Each will be followed by a discussion panel with the nominees (schedules permitting).

Tickets went on sale online on Thursday, 16 January at Oscars.org. Tickets are $5 for the general public and $3 for Academy members and students with a valid ID (Shorts and Foreign Language Films tickets limited to four per person). Doors open one hour prior to each event. All ticketed seating is unreserved. For more information, visit Oscars.org or call (310) 247-3600.

Public programming for 2020 Oscar Week is made possible in part by the Ruderman Family Foundation, which promotes authentic representation in the entertainment industry and full inclusion of people with disabilities throughout all sectors of society.

40 Years On: Frank Sinatra in Rio de Janeiro

20 Jan

40 years ago, in January 1980, the unlikely figure of the Chairman of the Board, Frank Sinatra, arrived in Rio de Janeiro. He landed on 21 January at Rio’s international airport to be the star attraction at the opening of a new five star hotel on Rio’s Copacabana Beach, the Rio Palace. A property that has been recently renovated and is now the Fairmont Rio.

Sinatra had been brought to Rio by the head of the Artplan advertising agency, Roberto Medina, a name familiar now as the man behind the famous Rock in Rio festivals. But it is unlikely that without the visit of Sinatra in 1980 that Rock in Rio would ever have taken place five years later, or that the gates would have opened for other major performers and artists to come to Brazil.

Medina had already worked with Sinatra, having used Ol Blue Eyes in an advert for the Brazilian bottled Scotch Whisky, Passport. Medina had also used David Niven and Burt Bacharach as part of the campaign. Sinatra also had his own links to Brazil having performed and recorded an album with Tom Jobim in 1967, which they followed up with a second in 1969.

Medina paid Sinatra a reported US$1 million for five shows in Rio. Four of these would be for an exclusive nightly audience of just 700 in the Rio Palace’s ballroom on the 22, 23, 24 and 25 of January 1980. The fifth show was altogether more ambitious, a stadium show on Saturday, 26 January at the Maracanã Stadium, which would also be broadcast in Brazil on TV Globo.

The shows at the Rio Palace were the place to be and be seen in Brazil that week of January 1980 (each ticket costing over US$1,000), and did what they were intended to do by putting the hotel on the map, both in Brazil and internationally. Few hotels outside of Las Vegas had the clout to attract Sinatra.

The famous concert at the Maracanã Stadium nearly did not take place, however, due to the weather. It was an open stage located right in the centre of the pitch. The special seats on the grass, closest to the uncovered stage, had been the first to sell out at US$160 each, with tickets in the stands costing just US$6.

Due to the persistent rain on the Friday and through Saturday, it was impossible to mic and wire the orchestra, and for a time it looked as if the concert would be called off and fall foul to the weather. And there was no back up date as Sinatra had to return to the US.

At 21.00, on the night of 26 January, Sinatra walked on stage just as the rain stopped and performed to the largest crowd of his career, 175,000 people, a crowd that went into the Guinness Book of record as the largest paying audience for a single act.

 

In honour of Brazil, Sinatra started with “The Coffee Song” which he followed by his repertoire of hits including “The Lady is a Tramp”, “I’ve Got You Under My Skin”, “Someone To Watch Over Me”, “My Way”, “Strangers In the Night”, which the crowd sang with Sinatra when he appeared to forget the lyrics, and his new hit that year, “New York, New York”. In all Sinatra performed for one hour and forty-five minutes.

Not only were Sinatra’s shows in Rio historic, but it showed that Brazil could hold major concerts. Sinatra was followed at Maracanã by Sting, Tina Turner, Kiss, Madonna, The Police, The Rolling Stones, Roger Waters, and the Pope, no-less, and in 1991 Medina’s own Rock in Rio II with headline acts such as Prince, Santana, George Michael, Guns’n Roses, A-ha! and INXS among others. But it was to be Sir Paul McCartney who, on another wet Saturday, would break Sinatra’s record for the paying public for a single act, when he sold an estimated 180,000 tickets for his show at the Maracanã

Sinatra was to return to play Brazil one more time, in August 1981 when he played the Maksoud Plaza hotel in São Paulo.

92nd Academy Awards Nominations

13 Jan

Nominations for the 92nd Academy Awards were announced on Monday, 13 January 2020 in Los Angeles.

The 92nd Oscars will be held on Sunday, February 9, 2020, at the Dolby Theatre at Hollywood & Highland Center in Hollywood, and will be televised live on the ABC Television Network.  The Oscars also will be televised live in more than 225 countries and territories worldwide.

Best motion picture of the year

  • “Ford v Ferrari” Peter Chernin, Jenno Topping and James Mangold, Producers
  • “The Irishman” Martin Scorsese, Robert De Niro, Jane Rosenthal and Emma Tillinger Koskoff, Producers
  • “Jojo Rabbit” Carthew Neal and Taika Waititi, Producers
  • “Joker” Todd Phillips, Bradley Cooper and Emma Tillinger Koskoff, Producers
  • “Little Women” Amy Pascal, Producer
  • “Marriage Story” Noah Baumbach and David Heyman, Producers
  • “1917” Sam Mendes, Pippa Harris, Jayne-Ann Tenggren and Callum McDougall, Producers
  • “Once upon a Time…in Hollywood” David Heyman, Shannon McIntosh and Quentin Tarantino, Producers
  • “Parasite” Kwak Sin Ae and Bong Joon Ho, Producers

Achievement in directing

  • “The Irishman” Martin Scorsese
  • “Joker” Todd Phillips
  • “1917” Sam Mendes
  • “Once upon a Time…in Hollywood” Quentin Tarantino
  • “Parasite” Bong Joon Ho

Performance by an actor in a leading role

  • Antonio Banderas in “Pain and Glory”
  • Leonardo DiCaprio in “Once upon a Time…in Hollywood”
  • Adam Driver in “Marriage Story”
  • Joaquin Phoenix in “Joker”
  • Jonathan Pryce in “The Two Popes

Performance by an actor in a supporting role

  • Tom Hanks in “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood”
  • Anthony Hopkins in “The Two Popes”
  • Al Pacino in “The Irishman”
  • Joe Pesci in “The Irishman”
  • Brad Pitt in “Once upon a Time…in Hollywood”

Performance by an actress in a leading role

  • Cynthia Erivo in “Harriet”
  • Scarlett Johansson in “Marriage Story”
  • Saoirse Ronan in “Little Women”
  • Charlize Theron in “Bombshell”
  • Renée Zellweger in “Judy”

Performance by an actress in a supporting role

  • Kathy Bates in “Richard Jewell”
  • Laura Dern in “Marriage Story”
  • Scarlett Johansson in “Jojo Rabbit”
  • Florence Pugh in “Little Women”
  • Margot Robbie in “Bombshell”

Best animated feature film of the year

  • “How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World” Dean DeBlois, Bradford Lewis and Bonnie Arnold
  • “I Lost My Body” Jérémy Clapin and Marc du Pontavice
  • “Klaus” Sergio Pablos, Jinko Gotoh and Marisa Román
  • “Missing Link” Chris Butler, Arianne Sutner and Travis Knight
  • “Toy Story 4” Josh Cooley, Mark Nielsen and Jonas Rivera

Achievement in cinematography

  • “The Irishman” Rodrigo Prieto
  • “Joker” Lawrence Sher
  • “The Lighthouse” Jarin Blaschke
  • “1917” Roger Deakins
  • “Once upon a Time…in Hollywood” Robert Richardson

Achievement in costume design

  • “The Irishman” Sandy Powell and Christopher Peterson
  • “Jojo Rabbit” Mayes C. Rubeo
  • “Joker” Mark Bridges
  • “Little Women” Jacqueline Durran
  • “Once upon a Time…in Hollywood” Arianne Phillips

Best documentary feature

  • “American Factory” Steven Bognar, Julia Reichert and Jeff Reichert
  • “The Cave” Feras Fayyad, Kirstine Barfod and Sigrid Dyekjær
  • “The Edge of Democracy” Petra Costa, Joanna Natasegara, Shane Boris and Tiago Pavan
  • “For Sama” Waad al-Kateab and Edward Watts
  • “Honeyland” Ljubo Stefanov, Tamara Kotevska and Atanas Georgiev

Best documentary short subject

  • “In the Absence” Yi Seung-Jun and Gary Byung-Seok Kam
  • “Learning to Skateboard in a Warzone (If You’re a Girl)” Carol Dysinger and Elena Andreicheva
  • “Life Overtakes Me” John Haptas and Kristine Samuelson
  • “St. Louis Superman” Smriti Mundhra and Sami Khan
  • “Walk Run Cha-Cha” Laura Nix and Colette Sandstedt

Achievement in film editing

  • “Ford v Ferrari” Michael McCusker and Andrew Buckland
  • “The Irishman” Thelma Schoonmaker
  • “Jojo Rabbit” Tom Eagles
  • “Joker” Jeff Groth
  • “Parasite” Yang Jinmo

Best international feature film of the year

  • “Corpus Christi” Poland
  • “Honeyland” North Macedonia
  • “Les Misérables” France
  • “Pain and Glory” Spain
  • “Parasite” South Korea

Achievement in makeup and hairstyling

  • “Bombshell” Kazu Hiro, Anne Morgan and Vivian Baker
  • “Joker” Nicki Ledermann and Kay Georgiou
  • “Judy” Jeremy Woodhead
  • “Maleficent: Mistress of Evil” Paul Gooch, Arjen Tuiten and David White
  • “1917” Naomi Donne, Tristan Versluis and Rebecca Cole

Achievement in music written for motion pictures (Original score)

  • “Joker” Hildur Guðnadóttir
  • “Little Women” Alexandre Desplat
  • “Marriage Story” Randy Newman
  • “1917” Thomas Newman
  • “Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker” John Williams

Achievement in music written for motion pictures (Original song)

  • “I Can’t Let You Throw Yourself Away” from “Toy Story 4”
    Music and Lyric by Randy Newman
  • “(I’m Gonna) Love Me Again” from “Rocketman”
    Music by Elton John; Lyric by Bernie Taupin
  • “I’m Standing With You” from “Breakthrough”
    Music and Lyric by Diane Warren
  • “Into The Unknown” from “Frozen II”
    Music and Lyric by Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez
  • “Stand Up” from “Harriet”
    Music and Lyric by Joshuah Brian Campbell and Cynthia Erivo

Achievement in production design

  • “The Irishman” Production Design: Bob Shaw; Set Decoration: Regina Graves
  • “Jojo Rabbit” Production Design: Ra Vincent; Set Decoration: Nora Sopková
  • “1917” Production Design: Dennis Gassner; Set Decoration: Lee Sandales
  • “Once upon a Time…in Hollywood” Production Design: Barbara Ling; Set Decoration: Nancy Haigh
  • “Parasite” Production Design: Lee Ha Jun; Set Decoration: Cho Won Woo

Best animated short film

  • “Dcera (Daughter)” Daria Kashcheeva
  • “Hair Love” Matthew A. Cherry and Karen Rupert Toliver
  • “Kitbull” Rosana Sullivan and Kathryn Hendrickson
  • “Memorable” Bruno Collet and Jean-François Le Corre
  • “Sister” Siqi Song

Best live action short film

  • “Brotherhood” Meryam Joobeur and Maria Gracia Turgeon
  • “Nefta Football Club” Yves Piat and Damien Megherbi
  • “The Neighbors’ Window” Marshall Curry
  • “Saria” Bryan Buckley and Matt Lefebvre
  • “A Sister” Delphine Girard

Achievement in sound editing

  • “Ford v Ferrari” Donald Sylvester
  • “Joker” Alan Robert Murray
  • “1917” Oliver Tarney and Rachael Tate
  • “Once upon a Time…in Hollywood” Wylie Stateman
  • “Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker” Matthew Wood and David Acord

Achievement in sound mixing

  • “Ad Astra” Gary Rydstrom, Tom Johnson and Mark Ulano
  • “Ford v Ferrari” Paul Massey, David Giammarco and Steven A. Morrow
  • “Joker” Tom Ozanich, Dean Zupancic and Tod Maitland
  • “1917” Mark Taylor and Stuart Wilson
  • “Once upon a Time…in Hollywood” Michael Minkler, Christian P. Minkler and Mark Ulano

Achievement in visual effects

  • “Avengers: Endgame” Dan DeLeeuw, Russell Earl, Matt Aitken and Dan Sudick
  • “The Irishman” Pablo Helman, Leandro Estebecorena, Nelson Sepulveda-Fauser and Stephane Grabli
  • “The Lion King” Robert Legato, Adam Valdez, Andrew R. Jones and Elliot Newman
  • “1917” Guillaume Rocheron, Greg Butler and Dominic Tuohy
  • “Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker” Roger Guyett, Neal Scanlan, Patrick Tubach and Dominic Tuohy

Adapted screenplay

  • “The Irishman” Screenplay by Steven Zaillian
  • “Jojo Rabbit” Screenplay by Taika Waititi
  • “Joker” Written by Todd Phillips & Scott Silver
  • “Little Women” Written for the screen by Greta Gerwig
  • “The Two Popes” Written by Anthony McCarten

Original screenplay

  • “Knives Out” Written by Rian Johnson
  • “Marriage Story” Written by Noah Baumbach
  • “1917” Written by Sam Mendes & Krysty Wilson-Cairns
  • “Once upon a Time…in Hollywood” Written by Quentin Tarantino
  • “Parasite” Screenplay by Bong Joon Ho, Han Jin Won; Story by Bong Joon Ho

Brazilian Film Box Office in 2019

12 Jan

Back in November 2018 panellists at Festival do Rio’s RioMarket were unanimously optimistic about the state of the Brazilian theatrical film market for 2019, after what all agreed had been a difficult year in 2018 for distribution, exhibition and getting “bums on seats”.

It turns out those panelists had a right to be optimistic. Ticket sales increased from 163.4 million in 2018 to 172.2 million in 2019, with 19.7 million of those being for “Avengers: Endgame”. Revenues in reais (the Brazilian currency) hit the historic high of R$2.74 billion in 2019, up 13% from 2.42 billion in 2018 and beating the previous high of R$2.7 billion in 2017. The year also saw the opening of another 174 screens, taking the total to 3,505. Another record.

Domestic Brazilian titles were responsible for 11.5% of that revenue in 2019, or R$315m, up 13% from R$279m in 2018, but actual ticket sales for Brazilian films were down 1.2% from 22.9m tickets in 2018 to 22.6m in 2019, with 2.5 million of those, or nearly 10%, sold in the final week of 2019 thanks to the comedy “Minha Mãe É Uma Peça 3” (My Mom is a Character 3). 327 Brazilian titles were released in 2019, down 11% from 367 in 2018, while international titles released in 2019 were 560, down 1.7% from 570 in 2018.

For nearly a decade, up to 2017, Brazil’s theatrical market had experienced growth. It had to stop at some point, so after eight consecutive years of increased ticket sales and revenues, 2017 became the year of no growth in Brazil, but the numbers were still very strong. 2018 was to see a further decline in ticket sales, and the first decline in 12 years in box office revenues in the local currency. But head offices in the US were still not complaining about the results they were seeing from Brazil, still one of the world’s largest cinema going markets.

Cinema admissions in Brazil had now gone from 89.1 million in 2008 to 112.7m in 2009; 134.9m in 2010; 143.2m in 2011; 146.6m in 2012, the year Brazil hosted the World Cup; 149.5m in 2013; 155.6m in 2014; 173m in 2015, to the record breaking 184.3 million in 2016, surprisingly the year of the Rio Olympics. In 2017, no record, but still the very respectable sales of 181 million ticket were achieved, a drop of just 1.5%, compared with 2016, but still the second best year on record, before the drop of 10.1% to 163.4m in 2018, but now an increase of 7.6% to 172.2m ticket sales in 2019.

The strength and volatility of the US dollar against the Brazilian real has meant dollar values were down in 2019. 2017’s gross had represented US$749.7 million at the time, up from US$726m in 2016 and just US$486m in 2015, while 2018’s dollar revenues were down to US$630m, and 2019’s box office is estimated to have been worth around US$594 million. But if exchange rates worked against them, the studios should still be happy with the number of “bums on seats”.

In 2018 factors contributing to what was seen as a disappointing year for ticket sales and revenues for the big screen in Brazil included the World Cup, the Brazilian Presidential Elections, and a truckers strike that almost brought Brazil to a halt for two weeks. Panellists at Rio Market also mentioned a disappointing line up of both domestic and international titles that had failed to find or excite an audience in Brazil. In fact 2018 was generally very sluggish in Brazil with only 127 million tickets having been sold up until the end of September, mainly thanks to the April release of “Avengers: Infinity War”, before the market showed signs of recovery in October and early November thanks to “A Star is Born”, “Venom”, “Bohemian Rhapsody” and “Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald”, and in December “Aquaman”.

Panellists at RioMarket were particularly encouraged by “A Star is Born” and “Bohemian Rhapsody” because these two films did not fill the normal blockbuster form of an established franchise or action character. All panellists, however, noted that both for international and domestic Brazilian releases, it was around the top ten to 15 releases that did really well, with the other 400+ titles struggling and offering a lot of room for improvement.

2019’s box office, however, was firmly dominated again by established franchises or action characters with “Avengers: Endgame” becoming the most watched film of all time in Brazil with sales of 19.2 million tickets, and Disney’s “The Lion King” selling 15.8 million to make it the third most watched of all time after “Titanic” in 1998. “Avengers: Infinity War” is fourth on the list

The average occupancy rates of the 3,500 screens in Brazil, the majority in multiplexes and over 30% of them in the state of São Paulo and 11% in Rio, has been running at around 18-19%, yet capacity is a problem in Brazil whenever a major blockbuster, like “Avengers” is released. There is no question that Brazil is under screened with just one screen for every 62,293 people, compared with 8,123 in the US or 15,253 for the UK.

The expansion of screens in Brazil, now back to the levels of the 1970s, also slowed in 2018 and 2019 and this has been put down to the economic climate in Brazil that saw a slowing in the expansion of shopping centres where new screens would be located. Shopping Centre screens are also the most successful in Brazil in terms of revenues and tickets sales. Having said that, 174 screen did open in 2019 (44 closed), taking the total of screens past the 3,500 mark. Since 2017 it is estimated that 434 new screens have come online, with 350 of those in the interior of the country and just 84 in the main cities.

In 2019 six cinema complexes in Brazil sold more than one million tickets in the year, those being UCI NYCC (Rio de Janeiro); Cinemark Guarulhos (São Paulo); UCI Kinoplex Norte Shopping (Rio de Janeiro); Kinoplex Dom Pedro (Campinas); Cinemark Aricanduva (São Paulo); and UCI Kinoplex Shopping Iguatemi (Fortaleza). Rio de Janeiro remains the state with the highest market share for domestic Brazilian releases.

Top 20 grossing films of the year in Brazil in 2019

  1. Avengers: Endgame (US$85.7 million from tickets sales of 19.2 million)
  2. The Lion King (US$69.5m / 15.8m)
  3. Captain Marvel (US$38.1m / 8.8m)
  4. Joker (US$38.1m / 9.4m)
  5. Toy Story 4 (US$32.7m / 7.8m)
  6. Spider Man: Far From Home (US$28.3 / 6.4m)
  7. Maleficent: Mistress of Evil (US$22.3m/ 5.6m)
  8. Aladdin (US$19.9m / 4.7m)
  9. Minha Vida em Marte (US$17.5m / 4.3m) *
  10. Ralph Breaks the Internet (US$17.3m / 4.3m)
  11. How To Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World (US$14.4m / 3.8m)
  12. Nada a Perder 2(Nothing To Lose 2 – US$13.7m / 5.2m) *
  13. Aquaman (US$12.4m 2.9m)
  14. Shazam! (US$12m / 2.9m)
  15. Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw (US$10.2 / 2.7m)
  16. Minha Mãe É Uma Peça 3 (My Mom is a Character 2 – US$7.6m / 2.6m) *
  17. Dumbo (US$7.6m / 1.8m)
  18. Turma da Monica: Laços (Monica’s Gang – US$7.5m / 2m) *
  19. De Pernas Pro Ar 3 (Head Over Heels 3 – US$7m / 1.8m) *
  20. The Secret Life of Pets (US$7m / 1.9m)

* Domestic Brazilian Release

Top 20 grossing films of the year in Brazil in 2018

  1. Avengers: Infinity War (US$66.7million from tickets sales of 14.5 million)
  2. Incredibles 2 (US$37.5m / 9.8m)
  3. Black Panther (US$35.8m / 7.4m)
  4. Nada a Perder (Nothing To Lose – US$33m / 12.2m) *
  5. Aquaman ($23.2m / 5.6m)
  6. Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (US$21.8m / 4.8m)
  7. Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (US$20.8m / 5.2m)
  8. The Nun (US$20m / 5.3m)
  9. Fifty Shades Freed (US$19.7m / 4.3m)
  10. Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation (US$19.5m / 5.4m)
  11. Venom (US$19m / 4.6m)
  12. Deadpool 2 (US$18.8m / 4.6m)
  13. Ferdinand (US$14.4m / 3.4m)
  14. Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald (US$14.2m / 3.5m)
  15. Bohemian Rhapsody (US$13.3m / 2.9m)
  16. Ant Man and the Wasp (US$13m / 3.2m)
  17. Mission Impossible – Fallout (US$11.8m / 2.5m)
  18. Os Farofeiros (The Beachnickers – US$9.8m / 2.6 m) *
  19. Coco (US$9.4m / 2.6m)
  20. Fala Serio Mãe ( US$9m /  2.4m) *

* Domestic Brazilian Release

Top 20 grossing films of the year in Brazil in 2017

  1. Fast & Furious 8: The Fate of the Furious ( US$41.8m from tickets sales of 8.5 million)
  2. Beauty and the Beast (US$41.5m / 8.3m);
  3. Despicable Me 3 (US$35.9m / 8.89m, the highest ticket sales of the year);
  4. Justice League (US$35.9m / 8.4m);
  5. Wonder Woman (US$ 33m / 7m);
  6. Spider-Man: Homecoming ($32m /6.7m);
  7. Thor: Ragnarok (US$30.4m / 6.4m)
  8. Logan (US$29.2m / 6.4m);
  9. Minha Mãe É Uma Peça 2 (My Mom is a Character 2 – US$27.9m / 6.5m) *
  10. The Shack (US$23.6m / 5.1m)
  11. Moana (US$22.9m / 5.1m)
  12. Guardians of the Galaxy 2 (US$21m / 4.2m)
  13. Fifty Shades Darker (US$20.3m / 4.6m)
  14. It (US$19.9m / 4.4m)
  15. Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales (US$16.7m /  3.6m)
  16. Star Wars: Episode VIII – The Last Jedi (US$16.1m / 3.1m)
  17. Wonder (US$16.1 / 4.1)
  18. The Boss Baby (US$13.9m / 3.3m)
  19. War of the Planet of the Apes (US$13.4m / 2.7m)
  20. The Mummy (US$13.3m / 3m)

* Domestic Brazilian Release

Abba’s Super Troupers Land at the O2 in London

6 Dec

Abba Super Troupers The Exhibition opened at the O2 in London on 6 December 2019 and is scheduled, to the delight of Abba fans visiting London, to run through 31 August 2020.

The new exhibition occupies a 14,000 square foot space within London’s home of music, offers a musical journey into the phenomenon that is ABBA (Agnetha Fältskog, Björn Ulvaeus, Benny Andersson, and Anni-Frid (“Frida”) Lyngstad)  while offering visitors a time capsule of the 1970s and 1980s, a period when the band’s eight albums and many singles dominated the global charts.

The exhibit charts their music, lyrics, creative process and influence as one of the most iconic pop bands of the modern age. It examines ABBA’s rise to global superstardom through a series of atmospheric rooms, exploring each of ABBA’s multi-million selling albums, alongside the band’s personal and public journey.

ABBA first burst onto the UK music scene with a dazzling win on 6 April 1974 at the Eurovision Song Contest at the Brighton Dome, with the song that would become their first UK chart-topper, “Waterloo”. 

The exhibition has been conceptualised and curated by Jude Kelly CBE, a renowned theatre director and the former artistic director at The Southbank Centre.

ABBA: Super Troupers The Exhibition displays an array of objects that include:

  • Personal artefacts from each musician’s youth that provide an insight into their pre-ABBA lives, including Björn’s school report, his military book and photographs from his time in service, and pictures of a 13-year-old Frida in a jazz band as a beatnik teenager.
  • Key items from the height of the band’s heyday, reflecting on both the personal – such as a collection of behind the scenes photos taken of the band on their ‘77 Australian “Arrival” tour – and the professional, with iconic items from the height of their success, including a limited-edition replica of the ‘Star Guitar’ played at Eurovision ’74, signed by all four members; over 40 Gold Discs from ABBA’s personal archive, including “Dancing Queen”, their biggest selling single, worldwide; a collection of exquisitely designed, image-defining costumes and personal clothing.
  • A recreation of superfan Andrew Boardman’s Manchester living room, a veritable shrine to ABBA memorabilia. Andrew began collecting 40 years ago, having fallen under the band’s spell when, at age 16, he first attended an ABBA concert. This room explores the notion that ABBA may have the most ardent and committed fans of any contemporary band.

Visitors are fully immersed in the ABBA story through the ABBA: Super Troupers The Exhibition’s theatrical staging, including:

  • A recreation of the Eurovision Song Contest stage at the Brighton Dome, where, from lush deep theatre seats, fans can watch the performance.
  • Multiple photo-opportunities, where attendees can capture themselves beside:
    • A full-sized replica of the helicopter that graced the cover of “Arrival’.
    • Replicas of the iconic “Super Trouper” album cover costumes.
    • A life-size replica of the scoreboard that saw ABBA secure Eurovision Song Contest victory (despite null points from the United Kingdom…).
  • A glimpse inside the band’s POLAR Studios, where the hard-working pop perfectionists refined their defining harmonised sound, with interactive elements that include a voice recording booth and mixing desk.
  • Ending the experience on a  high, guests are invited to sing, dance, add to fan mail, explore memorabilia and indeed say “Thank You For The Music” in The Legacy finale, as a specular audio-visual backdrop documents the very best of the band’s successes.

TICKETS

Tickets are sold in 30-minute entry slots. Anticipated average dwell time within the exhibition is 90 minutes.

Adult £27

Adult Return £59 (up to a maximum of 4 visits)

Child £13.50 (children under 5 go free)

Tickets available at abbasupertroupers.com or by calling 08442 491 000*

OPENING TIMES

Mon – Wed 10.00 until 19.30 (last ticket 18.00)

Thu – Fri 10.00 until 20.30 (last ticket 19.00)

Sat – Sun 09.30 until 19.30 (last ticket 18.00)

Closed 25th December 2019 and 1st Jan 2020

 

Some Fun ABBA Facts…

  • At the Grand Hotel in Brighton on the eve of Eurovision, quite by accident, ABBA discovered that the organisers had booked them into the Napoleon suite.  They took it as a good omen. 
  • Least glamorous fact – in 1979, ABBA fronted a poster for British Rail and Keep Britain Tidy
  • In 1973, ABBA competed in Melodifestivalen (the Swedish qualifying competition for the Eurovicion Song contest) with “Ring Ring” but only came third. 
  • When ABBA won Eurovision in Brighton with Waterloo, the UK gave them ‘nul points’. 
  • 3.5 million people applied for tickets to their 1977 London tour dates.
  • Lasse Hallström, who directed ABBA: The Movie and most of the band’s videos was nominated for Oscars for his direction on My Life as a Dog and The Cider House Rules. He also directed What’s Eating Gilbert Grape and Chocolat. 
  • ABBA scored their first number one album in the US in 2008. It was the film soundtrack to Mamma Mia. 
  • By the age of 19 Agnetha was already one of the most popular singer in Sweden.
  • ABBA Gold is one of the best-selling albums of all time in the UK, outselling Sgt Pepper’s. Lonely Hearts Club Band and second only to Queen’s Greatest Hits.
  • For the Sex Pistols’ 20th anniversary shows, John Lydon (an ABBA fan since early Seventies) wanted to walk onstage to ‘Dancing Queen’ in a bid to highlight how bad music was before punk – but, despite Lydon’s intentions, the crowd roared their approval and started dancing as soon as the ABBA hit kicked in. 
  • Already a household name, Agnetha played Mary Magdalene in the 1971 Swedish production of Jesus Christ Superstar.
  • Arrival was ABBA’s fourth LP but was their first studio release to hit the Number One spot in the UK (ABBA’s Greatest Hits went to No. 1 first).
  • Anni-Frid is a mezzo and Agnetha is a soprano. 
  • ABBA never officially broke up. In 1982 they decided to have a rest. It just went on a while. 
  • Both Led Zeppelin and Genesis recorded at Abba’s POLAR Studios.
  • After finally deciding on the name ABBA Benny flipped his “B” horizontally during a photo shoot. This inspired their official logo, though it was later given a proper design by Rune Soderqvist.
  • In 1973 after she had given birth to their daughter, Linda, Agnetha was replaced on their German tour by a lookalike. She was a local singer and friend of Anni-Frid called Inger Brundin.
  • A 1976 ABBA TV special, filmed in Australia, got more views than the 1969 moon landing in that country.
  • ABBA were the very first group from a non-English-speaking country to achieve top spots in charts in all English-speaking countries including Canada, Ireland, Australia and New Zealand, South Africa, the United Kingdom and the United States.

Mamma Mia: The Party!

The O2 is also home to the Abba dining and party experience, “Mamma Mia! The Party”. To book and more information CLICK HERE

Anglo-Brazilian Society / Anglo-Portuguese-Society Joint reception

4 Dec

The Anglo-Brazilian Society and the Anglo-Portuguese Society hosted a very special evening for members, friends and guests at the residence of the Portuguese Ambassador, to London, HE Manuel Lobo Antunes, on Monday 2 December. The societies joined forces to celebrate Christmas and the year end in style. A great way to start the Festive season.

Guest included the Portuguese Ambassador and senior diplomats from both embassies. Baroness Hooper, who is a senior member of both the Portuguese and Brazilian All Party Parliamentary groups, was present, as was Sir Peter Heap, an ex-British Ambassador to Brazil and a board member of the ABS.

The evening offered the tastes and flavours of both Brazil and Portuguese. Brazilian chef, Luciana Berry worked with the team at the Portuguese Ambassador’s residence to prepare the food that reflected both countries, while Portuguese wines and Brazilian caipirinhas were served. Brazilian musician Aleh Ferreira performed a selection of bossa nova and MPB favourites.

Chris Pickard of Critical Divide is chair of the Anglo-Brazilian Society and Sandro Carito of Carito International is chair of the Anglo-Portuguese Society.