Tag Archives: brazil

Anglo-Brazilian Society / Anglo-Portuguese-Society Joint reception

4 Dec

The Anglo-Brazilian Society and the Anglo-Portuguese Society hosted a very special evening for members, friends and guests at the residence of the Portuguese Ambassador, to London, HE Manuel Lobo Antunes, on Monday 2 December. The societies joined forces to celebrate Christmas and the year end in style. A great way to start the Festive season.

Guest included the Portuguese Ambassador and senior diplomats from both embassies. Baroness Hooper, who is a senior member of both the Portuguese and Brazilian All Party Parliamentary groups, was present, as was Sir Peter Heap, an ex-British Ambassador to Brazil and a board member of the ABS.

The evening offered the tastes and flavours of both Brazil and Portuguese. Brazilian chef, Luciana Berry worked with the team at the Portuguese Ambassador’s residence to prepare the food that reflected both countries, while Portuguese wines and Brazilian caipirinhas were served. Brazilian musician Aleh Ferreira performed a selection of bossa nova and MPB favourites.

Chris Pickard of Critical Divide is chair of the Anglo-Brazilian Society and Sandro Carito of Carito International is chair of the Anglo-Portuguese Society.

Wallpaper Magazine picks two from Brazil amongst world top eight urban hotels

1 Dec

Brazil is home to two of the eight hotels chosen by Wallpaper* magazine from a short list of 37 as the best urban hotels in the world for 2019.

The chosen hotels in Brazil, the only in Latin America, are the Janeiro hotel in Rio, which fills the building on the beachfront in Leblon that many will remember as the Marina Rio, and the B Hotel in Brasilia.

The other hotels listed by Wallpaper were The Jaffa in Tel Aviv; Trunk House in Tokyo; Soho House in Mumbai; Rosewood in Hong Kong; Raffles in Singapore; and The August in Antwerp.

As Wallpaper noted: “These destination hotels demonstrate flexibility in a brave and competitive new world.  There’s never been a more exciting time to check in.”

Full story in the December edition of Wallpaper. Click Here

50 Best Restaurants in Latin America

11 Oct

The list of Latin America’s 50 Best Restaurants for 2019 was revealed on 10 October 2019 at the seventh annual Latin America’s 50 Best Restaurants awards ceremony, sponsored by S.Pellegrino & Acqua Panna, that was held at Usina del Arte in Buenos Aires, Argentina. With seven new restaurants and entries across eight countries, the 2019 list reflects the diversity of the ever-evolving Latin American gastronomic scene.

Maido in Lima took the No.1 spot for the third consecutive year, retaining its status as The Best Restaurant in Latin America. Maido, or ‘welcome’ in Japanese, is the flagship restaurant of chef Mitsuharu ‘Micha’ Tsumura, serving inventive tasting menus of Peruvian-Japanese bites such as fish hotdog and sea urchin rice, alongside à la carte options and a classic sushi counter.

Three-time former winner Central is at No.2. Pujol, in Mexico City, is ranked at No.3, followed by Don Julio in Buenos Aires at No.4 and Boragó in Santiago at No.5 – receiving the titles of The Best Restaurant in Mexico, Argentina and Chile, respectively.

Mexico and Peru lead the 2019 list with 11 entries each, including Alcalde for Mexico, winner of the Highest Climber Award, and Central for Peru, recipient of the Sustainable Restaurant Award. Brazil claims nine spots – including new entries Evvai and Manu – followed by Argentina with eight entries and Chile with six.

This year, Latin America’s 50 Best Restaurants features seven new entries: Kjolle, Pía León’s rising restaurant based in Lima, receives the Highest New Entry Award, occupying the No.21 spot on the list. De Patio in Santiago, Chile enters the list at No.34; Mil in Cusco, Peru sits at No.36; La Docena in Mexico City’s Polanco district occupies No.38; while Manu in Curitiba, Brazil enters the list at No.42. The seventh new entry is Mayta from Lima, Peru at No.49.

Latin America’s 50 Best Restaurants 2019:

1 Maido (Lima, Peru) *The Best Restaurant in Latin
America/The Best Restaurant in Peru
26 La Mar (Lima, Peru)
2 Central (Lima, Peru) *Sustainable Restaurant Award 27 Rosetta (Mexico City, Mexico)
3 Pujol (Mexico City, Mexico) *The Best Restaurant in Mexico 28 Máximo Bistrot (Mexico City, Mexico)
4 Don Julio (Buenos Aires, Argentina) *The Best Restaurant in
Argentina
29 Chila (Buenos Aires, Argentina)
5 Boragó (Santiago, Chile) *The Best Restaurant in Chile 30 Ambrosía (Santiago, Chile)
6 A Casa do Porco (São Paulo, Brazil) *The Best Restaurant in
Brazil
31 Nicos (Mexico City, Mexico)
7 El Chato (Bogotá, Colombia) *The Best Restaurant in
Colombia
32 Le Chique (Cancun, Mexico)
8 Leo (Bogotá, Colombia) 33 Parador La Huella (José Ignacio, Uruguay) *The Best Restaurant in
Uruguay
9 Osso (Lima, Peru) 34 De Patio (Santiago, Chile) *New Entry
10 D.O.M. (São Paulo, Brazil) 35 Olympe (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)
11 Quintonil (Mexico City, Mexico) 36 Mil (Cusco, Peru) *New Entry
12 Isolina (Lima, Peru) 37 Restaurante 040 (Santiago, Chile)
13 Astrid y Gastón (Lima, Peru) 38 La Docena (Polanco, Mexico City, Mexico) *New Entry
14 Alcalde (Guadalajara, Mexico) *Highest Climber 39 El Baqueano (Buenos Aires, Argentina)
15 Pangea (Monterrey, Mexico) 40 Evvai (São Paulo, Brazil) *New Entry
16 Sud 777 (Mexico City, Mexico) 41 La Docena (Guadalajara, Mexico)
17 Maito (Panama City, Panama) *The Best Restaurant in
Panama
42 Manu (Curitiba, Brazil) *New Entry
18 Maní (São Paulo, Brazil) 43 Mocotó (São Paulo, Brazil)
19 Rafael (Lima, Peru) 44 Osaka (Santiago, Chile)
20 Mishiguene (Buenos Aires, Argentina) 45 Elena (Buenos Aires, Argentina)
21 Kjolle (Lima, Peru) *Highest New Entry 46 Gran Dabbang (Buenos Aires, Argentina)
22 Harry Sasson (Bogotá, Colombia) 47 99 (Santiago, Chile)
23 Oteque (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) 48 Malabar (Lima, Peru)
24 Lasai (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) *Art of Hospitality Award 49 Mayta (Lima, Peru) *New Entry
25 Tegui (Buenos Aires, Argentina) 50 Narda Comedor (Buenos Aires, Argentina)

 

TV Globo expands studio complex in Rio

9 Aug

Brazil’s largest media group, Grupo Globo, has inaugurated three new studios and an expanded backlot to make Estúdios Globo in Jacarepagua in Rio de Janeiro the largest TV production centre in Latin America.

Between them the three new wireless studios cover an area equivalent to four football pitches. In total the complex now has thirteen studios, including two for shows involving an audience.

The first production to use the new facility in October will be the TV Globo novela “Amor de Mãe”, written by Manuela Dias and directed by José Luiz Villamarim.

Chris Pickard elected chair of the Anglo-Brazilian Society

6 Aug

Critical Divide’s, Chris Pickard, has been invited and elected to chair the Anglo-Brazilian Society.

The Society was established in London back in 1943 to help to promote close and friendly relations between Brazil and Britain and to increase Britain’s knowledge of Brazil and its culture. The Society, which is based in the Embassy of Brazil in London, is a registered UK charity that is passionately committed to raising funds for worthwhile Brazilian projects, especially those that address the needs of underprivileged children and their families.

Chris also currently chairs the LATA Foundation, but will stand down at the AGM in September after ten years as a founding trustee and two as chair.

You can read more about and follow the activities of the Anglo-Brazilian Society on its website, Facebook or on Twitter @anglobrazsoc

Mangueira is 2019 Champion of Rio’s Carnival

7 Mar

Estação Primeira de Mangueira is the champion of Rio’s top samba schools for the 20th time in its illustrious history after scoring a perfect total of 270 in 2019. Second, with 269.7 points, was Viraduro which has only just returned to the elite competition.

The results of Rio’s Carnival Parade in 2019 were:

  • Mangueira (270 points out of 270)
  • Viraduro (269.7)
  • Vila Isabel (269.4)
  • Salgueiro (269.3)
  • Portela (269.3)
  • Mocidade Independente de Padre Miguel (269.0)
  • Unidos da Tijuca (268.8)
  • Paraíso do Tuiuti (268.5)
  • Grande Rio (267.9)
  • União da Ilha (267.7)
  • Beija-Flor (267.6)
  • São Clemente (267.4)
  • Imperatriz Leopoldinense (266,6)
  • Imperio Serrano (263.8)

You can read and learn more about Rio’s carnival on Critical Divide’s Rio: The Guide.

Photos courtesy of RioTur – the city of Rio Tourist Authority.

The Division (A Divisão): A film by Vicente Amorim

11 Feb

One of the most highly anticipated Brazilian films of 2019, Vicente Amorim’s The Division (A Divisão), has been introduced to international buyers during the 2019 Berlin Film Festival.

Based and inspired by disturbing and shocking events that took place during the 1990s in Rio de Janeiro, The Division (A Divisão) is a dark, modern, violent, action-crime-thriller from the acclaimed Brazilian filmmaker, Vicente Amorim, and producer José Junior, Rio’s leading expert on urban violence and head of the NGO (and now production company) AfroReggae Audiovisual. The Division will receive a wide mid-2019 theatrical release in Brazil through Downtown Filmes and Paris Filmes, the companies behind the largest and most successful box-office releases in Brazil in recent years, and is being handled internationally by WTFilms that has introduced the film to the international buyers and distributors at the EFM during the Berlin Film Festival.

“The film is really about redemption, their redemption,” says Amorim, “ and what it is that sets our protagonists apart from the people around them. Although set in the 1990s, The Division is the genesis of what we are living through in Brazil today, with a President who defined his election campaign around violence. It is this need to move forward ­– regardless of the consequences and without measuring the risks – that represents a portrait of modern Brazil. The film reveals the inside of a machine that may start turning again at any moment.”

In the late 1990s, kidnapping became the crime of choice in Rio de Janeiro, with ten or more high profile cases each month. The population, at least those with money, were scared, and the authorities appeared paralysed as large ransoms were paid and some of the kidnapped were held for months or never returned. As corrupt police and officials looked the other way, justice was neither done or seen to be done, as the machine, and those linked to it, were funded by the money being generated from the kidnappings.

To stop the rot, and as a last resort, two police officers – one an incorruptible killing machine with over 100 kills to his name (played by Silvio Guindane); the other a dirty cop known for extorting money from the criminals (Erom Cordeiro) – were brought together and put in charge of Rio’s Anti-Kidnapping Division by the city’s Secretary for Public Safety & Security, a hard line general from the days of the military dictatorship, and his head of police, a socialist lawyer. The Division is their story and how by using very good intelligence and some questionable methods to solve the kidnappings, the two policemen come close to victory as the ends do seem to justify their means. But can too much intelligence be a dangerous thing? The film is based on the real events and the real people.

Amorim’s previous films have screened at, among others, the Toronto, Rotterdam, Karlovy Vary, Montreal, San Sebastian and Rio de Janeiro film festivals. They include the thriller Motorrad, selected for Toronto in 2017; the Brazil-Japanese co-production Dirty Hearts (Corações Sujos); the ethical thriller Good, with Academy Award nominee Viggo Mortensen, a film considered one of the ten best movies of 2008 by The Hollywood Reporter and Rex Reed (The New York Observer); and The Middle of the World (O Caminho das Nuvens) with Wagner Moura; as well as five successful television series.

Despite his work with Brazilian TV, Amorim has deliberately chosen not to cast well-known Brazilian television actors in The Division, as he wants the characters to be credible and real.

Working with the screenwriting team, and as a consultant on the film, is José Luiz Magalhães, a Rio police officer for over 30 years who led the actual team that ended the kidnapping wave in Rio de Janeiro. In The Division, his first work as a screenwriter, he tells his own story, and helps add essential context and the truth of what happened and who was involved.

“He is a brave man,” says Amorim. “As are all the people involved in this project. We have had to change names to keep people alive.”

Amorim was also helped on The Division by José Junior, Creative Director and CEO of AfroReggae Audiovisual (the film’s production company), who has created and produced several television series for channels in Brazil such as Multishow and GNT, including Urban Connections (Conexões Urbanas). He was also the producer of the multi-award winning documentary Favela Rising. The Division is AfroReggae Audiovisual’s first feature, and in Brazil it will also be expanded into a multi-part TV series for Globosat.

“José gave us the access to people and places, and opened doors to locations where the real action took place,” adds Amorim. “He also made sure that the weaponry and other details used in the film are correct.”

Junior has mediated in a number of armed conflicts in Rio in a search for peace, and he is considered a pioneer for his work in helping free people in the favelas from a life of drugs and trafficking while helping to re-socialize them. His extraordinarily brave work at AfroReggae has been recognised internationally.

The film reunites Amorim and WTFilms, the Paris based sales company successfully sold the director’s Motorrad.  “Vicente’s style is immediately recognizable. He has a strong visual signature and the grittiness that buyers expect on Brazilian genre and action films,” explain WTFilms executives Dimitri Stephanides and Gregory Chambet.

Other partners in The Division include the co-producers Hungry Man, an international production company with offices in Los Angeles, New York, London, São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, and one of the world’s top production companies for commercials. Its short film Asad, was nominated for an Academy Award in 2013, and the company was nominated for an International Emmy this year for its five-part Words In Series (Palavras Em Série).

Co-producers include the successful Brazilian companies TV Globo, GloboFilmes, Globosat, GloboPlay, and the film’s Brazilian distributors, Downtown Filmes and Paris Filmes.